Adhoc Interviews

Theatrical Plain: LuCiana Ja’vonne


LuCiana (Ja’vonne) Miles is just as abstract as her work suggests. Her paintings exist as a unique representation of her self as she leaves marks of expression on the plane. LuCiana spent her academic career studying theater and its influences can be observed in her artistic language. The gestures of her painting are theatrical in movement and the colors seem to represent various moods and ideas depicted in the paintings that act as stories.

Like her paintings, looking at her twitter opens up a similar window into her abstract character. Short, nonsensical phrases like abstract haikus are all that make up the content. In a way, they are much like her paintings. They represent abstract ideas that are theatrical in nature. We are given no hint of the artist’s identity besides what she presents on the creative stage of painting and writing. Built on nothingness, they create whimsical ideas that inspire a viewer’s imagination.


tickled thyme. acrylic on canvas 2015
tickled thyme. acrylic on canvas 2015
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2014
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2014

What have you been currently working on with your work? You have an exhibition coming up at Custom’s House Museum in TN, can you tell me about that process so far and what we can expect?

Sure. The exhibition opening up in July is called pu-ri-na kaleidoscope. It’s my first solo exhibition. There really wasn’t a process, I go with my gut on a lot of things, this exhibition included. I did know that I wanted it to be a warm and simple experience.

When were you first introduced to art? What happened during that introduction that inspired you to create?

Art has been a part of my life since birth or for as long as I can remember, my parents are very big on art, culture, etc. There was no particular event that catapulted me into art, it’s pretty much all I know. Although painting did come later on in life.

What first attracted you to painting that inspired the relationship you have with it now?

I enjoy getting messy and playing in and with paint. My process is really no process and it’s been that way from the beginning.

surface level abyss. acrylic on canvas 2014
surface level abyss. acrylic on canvas 2014
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2015
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2015

Each work is charged with a unique personality that is described by color, texture and gesture. How does your relationship with the work begin to create these personalities? Do you approach it with an outcome in mind, or is it created along the way?

Generally my relationship with the work is very bodied and it’s created along the way. I mean physical. When I paint my body is generally very involved. I’m squatting, moving paint around with my fingers, sometimes painting with my fingers, it’s a physical act.

Untitled. acrylic on plywood 2015
Untitled. acrylic on plywood 2015
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2014
Untitled. acrylic on canvas 2014

Have you practiced with any other media that might have influenced how you communicate with your current media?

I love taking photos but I think painting may have influenced that more than the other way around. Or they’ve influenced each other equally.

It’s interesting you say that because your paintings are so abstract, very different than the objectiveness of a photograph. Can you expand on how they’ve influenced each other?

Well, when I first started taking photos my photos were more aesthetically pleasing, now my photos are a bit mundane and somewhat gritty, it’s possible that comes from painting. I also found my love for abandoned buildings through photography, which probably affected my painting in some way.

nectar orbits. acrylic on canvas 2015
nectar orbits. acrylic on canvas 2015
Skin Grafting. acrylic on plywood 2014
Skin Grafting. acrylic on plywood 2014

Whose work do you look up to in the art world, and what does their work mean to you?

There are so many I couldn’t name them. Dadaism is probably a part of who I am as a person and an artist. And some of my most treasured books are East of Eden by Steinbeck, No Exit by Sartre, and the Complete Plays of Sarah Kane.

I also love Dada, and find that to be one of my favorite movements because of the documentation of controlled chaos that is still informative. What is it about Dadaism that you find enjoy and are able to establish a relationship with?

I enjoy everything about it, but if I had to pick it would be the spontaneity of it, the simplicity of it, and the aversion to narrative.

lacquered pores. acrylic on canvas 2015
lacquered pores. acrylic on canvas 2015
60F6EA4C-5287-4C70-B6E6-3289E34FB53E
Untitled. acrylic on plywood 2015


Last modified: May 2, 2016